3 February 2023, Friday, 0:10
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Oleh Belokolos: Lukashenka To Get What He Deserves

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Oleh Belokolos: Lukashenka To Get What He Deserves

The dictator has confessed his part in the war.

Representative of Russia to the UN Vasily Nebenzia says "Russia is ready for negotiations". The negotiations issue began to resound both in propaganda shows and in surveys of sociological services controlled by Moscow.

What is the Kremlin's new narrative related to? What does Ukraine think of negotiations? How will participation in the war affect the Lukashenka regime?

Oleh Belokolos, a foreign and security policy expert at the Maidan Foreign Affairs Foundation and former advisor at the Ukrainian embassy in Canada and Kenya, answered these and other questions for Charter97.org.

- You know, this is an instrument not of peace but of war. It is worth unequivocally understanding that all these Russian statements have nothing to do with peace. Russia uses this tool in order to get its wind, to try to weaken sanctions, to get money from selling its raw materials, and to spend all this on war.

In parallel with the "peace proposals" from the Kremlin master, there are, for example, delusional ideas about the Sea of Azov, which themselves disavow these "proposals".

- How relevant is the topic of negotiations in Ukraine or is it a marginal idea?

- Ukraine does not take negotiations seriously. It's decided on top level that no negotiations are possible with the leadership of the Russian Federation. Ukraine does not believe the Kremlin's statements and, frankly speaking, if this topic is mentioned somewhere, no one discusses it seriously. Ukrainian society is mature enough not to fall for such information.

- When Ukraine achieves its goals and Moscow is forced to stop the war, what would this agreement look like?

- I think it is early to seriously discuss such things. It is already obvious that Russia has lost, but the question is how long its agony will last. The fact that the Nazis lost the war was already clear in 1943. Nevertheless, the war continued for two more years, people were dying and Europe was being destroyed.

I can say that signing a declaration on not holding separatist agreements between our allies and Russia, similar to the one that was adopted at the Casablanca conference in World War II, is a useful tool for Ukraine on the international level. We need to force the Russian regime to make peace, but it is difficult and early to say how ait will happen.

- Should the declaration you mentioned, for example, stipulate the demilitarization of Belarus?

- I've been saying for a long time that we in Ukraine and many people in the West consider the dictatorial tandem of Putin and Lukashenka as one and the same. Companies are leaving the two markets and many sanctions are being applied in parallel to both regimes. Therefore, whatever happens to the Russian regime should also happen to the Belarusian one.

Both regimes severely suppress rights and freedoms. Plus Lukashenka has openly admitted that he takes part in the Russian aggression in Ukraine. Therefore, the Belarusian regime must also get what it deserves.